Book of Jasher

2 Samuel 1:18 (KJV)

 (Also he bade them teach the children of Judah the use of the bow: behold, it is written in the book of Jasher.)

What is the Book of Jasher? The Bible mentions it a couple of times, but there is no book called Jasher in the Bible. I first came across it four years ago today, and I meant to do a post on this then, but quickly forgot about it. The only reason I remembered today is because I’d posted about it on Facebook at the time, and it appeared in my memories.

As you can see, there’s a second reference to the Book of Jasher in the Bible. It’s found in Joshua.

Joshua 10:13 (KJV)

And the sun stood still, and the moon stayed, until the people had avenged themselves upon their enemies. Is not this written in the book of Jasher? So the sun stood still in the midst of heaven, and hasted not to go down about a whole day.

So what exactly is the Book of Jasher? The Wikipedia for it says,

The Book of Jasher (also, Jashar) or the Book of the Upright or the Book of the Just Man (Hebrew: סֵפֶר הַיׇּשׇׁר‬; transliteration: sēfer hayyāšār) is an unknown book mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. The translation “Book of the Just Man” is the traditional Greek and Latin translation, while the transliterated form “Jasher” is found in the King James Bible, 1611.

During my research, I quickly down the entire text of the book online, and it seems to have a biblical feel to it. It starts off with the Creation story and everything. But something just didn’t feel right about it. Then I remembered something about the Wikipedia page. It calls it and “unknown book”. How could it be unknown if I’m staring at the text. So I kept looking and quickly found my answer, in the form of another Wikipedia page.

The Book of Jasher, also called Pseudo-Jasher, is an 18th-century literary forgery by Jacob Ilive. It purports to be an English translation by Flaccus Albinus Alcuinus of the lost Book of Jasher. It is sometimes called Pseudo-Jasher to distinguish it from the midrashic Sefer haYashar (Book of the Upright, Naples, 1552), which incorporates genuine Jewish legend.

What I was reading was a fake. In fact, there are several books title Book of Jasher which claim to be the one mentioned in scripture. In actuality, the original book has been lost forever, with these two biblical verses being the full extent of what we really know about it.

Archeobiblical: Introduction

“Archeobiblical” is a word I apparently just made up. Thought it was a preexisting word until I Google’d it. I mean it to mean “Archeological evidence which backs up the Bible”. My browser is putting a red line under “archeological”, because it’s usually spelled “archaeological”, meaning it thinks it’s misspelled, meaning it thinks the “archeo” part of this category is wrong. Well, the word is on dictionary.com, showing it can be spelled both ways. So take that, Firefox!

Anyway, I’ve always been interested in archaeology since I was very little. My family probably still remember the years I spent obsessed with Ancient Egypt, to the point where my mom printed out over fifty pages of newly discovered information about the subject (because at the time I only had very old books). It wasn’t until a little over a year ago that it even occurred to me that you could use the subject to back up the claims in the Bible. I’d always just assumed the stories to be true, and that the individual stories couldn’t be validated. It wasn’t until I heard about Ron Wyatt that my mind was opened to this.

After that, I started researching biblical archaeology, but even then it never occurred to me to write about it on this blog until a few days ago. I watched a documentary on Netflix called Patterns of Evidence: Exodus. It shows that using archaeology, the “experts” (skeptics) could be proven wrong. It’s a very good film, and I highly recommend anyone with even a slight interest in the subject to give it a watch.

After watching it, I started wanting to do a series on here about biblical archaeology. My only problem was coming up with a title. I wanted something unique, instead of “Archaeological Evidence That Back Up The Bible”. First off, that’s too long, and second that’s a boring title. Finally, I was sitting here and thought, “…..Archeobiblical!!”

And the rest is history. Or will be. Or whatever.